Personal omics data informative for precision health and preventive care

http://ift.tt/2yzRXn3 Multi-omics profiling, the measurement and analysis of a person’s genome along with other biomolecular traits, is an important step toward personal health management that provides valuable, actionable information, according to new findings.

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How genes and environment interact to raise risk of congenital heart defects

http://ift.tt/2l6KdTM Infants of mothers with diabetes have a three- to five-fold increased risk of congenital heart defects. Such developmental defects are likely caused by a combination of genetic and environmental factors. However, the molecular mechanisms by which maternal diabetes disrupts normal heart development in genetically susceptible individuals remain unclear. In a new study, researchers describe a gene-environment interaction resulting in congenital heart defects in both mouse and fly model systems.

How genes and environment interact to raise risk of congenital heart defects

http://ift.tt/2l6KdTM Infants of mothers with diabetes have a three- to five-fold increased risk of congenital heart defects. Such developmental defects are likely caused by a combination of genetic and environmental factors. However, the molecular mechanisms by which maternal diabetes disrupts normal heart development in genetically susceptible individuals remain unclear. In a new study, researchers describe a gene-environment interaction resulting in congenital heart defects in both mouse and fly model systems.

Maternal diet may program child for disease risk, but better nutrition later can change that

http://ift.tt/2yDwSWs A mother’s diet during pregnancy, particularly one that is high-fat, may program her baby for future risk of certain diseases such as diabetes, new research shows. The new study shows that switching the offspring to a new diet — a low-fat diet, in this case — can reverse that programming.

Lower brain glucose levels found in people with obesity, type 2 diabetes

http://ift.tt/2yCD15d Glucose levels are reduced in the brains of individuals with obesity and type 2 diabetes compared to lean individuals, according to a new study. The finding might explain disordered eating behavior — and even a higher risk of Alzheimer’s disease — among obese and diabetic individuals, the researchers said.