A drug long used to treat gout may help adult heart failure patients

http://ift.tt/2EKJi5a Researchers have shown that probenecid, a drug long used to treat gout, may be able to improve heart function in adult patients who experience heart failure.

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Being female is not a protective factor against heart disease in type 1 diabetes

http://ift.tt/2Hx7fKZ Constrictions of the coronary blood vessels is a possible consequence of type 1 diabetes, and one that can eventually lead to myocardial infarction or heart failure. Generally speaking, women are afflicted by coronary artery disease later than men, but if a woman has type 2 diabetes, the advantage is negated. A new report now shows that this also sometimes applies to type 1 diabetes.

Being female is not a protective factor against heart disease in type 1 diabetes

http://ift.tt/2Hx7fKZ Constrictions of the coronary blood vessels is a possible consequence of type 1 diabetes, and one that can eventually lead to myocardial infarction or heart failure. Generally speaking, women are afflicted by coronary artery disease later than men, but if a woman has type 2 diabetes, the advantage is negated. A new report now shows that this also sometimes applies to type 1 diabetes.

Higher risk of dementia for adults with congenital heart disease, study shows

http://ift.tt/2sHSSQm A new study is believed to be the first to show a higher risk of dementia in adults who were born with heart disease. The study of more than 10,000 adult with congenital heart disease (CHD) in Denmark discovered a particularly increased risk for early dementia in middle-age adults.

Resolvin D-1 limits kidney damage after heart attacks

http://ift.tt/2C9DpMS A heart attack triggers an acute inflammatory response at the damaged portion of the heart’s left ventricle. If the inflammation lingers, it can lead heart failure. The inflammation can also claim another victim — the kidneys. New research shows that a bioactive compound called resolvin D-1, injected as a therapeutic dose, is able to limit this collateral damage in the kidneys, as tested in an animal model. This suggests potential application to the clinical setting.

A trip to the mountains despite a heart condition?

http://ift.tt/2BDxhvw Cardiologists are in agreement that generally exercise in the mountains is a very good way to prevent or reduce the occurrence of cardiovascular diseases. Nevertheless what about those people who have a pre-existing cardiovascular condition? Under what circumstances is it safe for them to reside or holiday in high mountainous regions, and what rules should they apply to their conduct whilst there?